The ASK Wellness Society would like to acknowledge that our programs and facilities operate on Secwepemcúl'ecw, Nłeʔkepmx Tmíxʷ, and Syilx tmixʷ traditional and unceded territories.
June 30, 2022

Pride 2022

Today, as the last day of June marks the final day of Pride Month, ASK Wellness Society is excited to share this alternate ASK logo that we have recently created.

Today, as the last day of June marks the final day of Pride Month, ASK Wellness Society is excited to share this alternate ASK logo that we have recently created. As a representation of allegiance and commitment to inclusion, one of our four core values, we are incredibly proud to have the “Progress Pride Flag” incorporated into our logo. We intend for it to act as a physical symbol in support of our 2SLGBTQ+ community. Some may not know the history of the pride flag and the symbolic representation behind each of the colours.

The Pride Flag has undergone multiple iterations since the “rainbow flag” was first created by Gilbert Baker in 1978. It was initially created to recognize and celebrate members of the gay and lesbian political movement. Intended to be a symbol of hope, each of the original eight colours were assigned meaning by the designer:

  • pink for sex
  • red for life
  • orange for healing
  • yellow for sunlight
  • green for nature
  • turquoise for magic
  • indigo for serenity
  • violent for spirit.
  • The following year pink and turquoise were removed from the flag.

In 2018, the Pride Flag went through a change and is referred to as the “Progress Pride Flag”, which was designed by Daniel Quasar. The Progress Pride Flag was intended to be more inclusive.

As described by V&A Museum of Art and Design, “From one flag reboot to another, the coloured stripes are imbued with different meanings. For Quasar, the light bluepink and white stripes [added onto the left side of the flag] represent trans and non-binary individuals. The brown and black ones represent marginalized People of Colour (POC) communities. The black stripe has a double meaning, as it is also intended for those living with AIDS and the stigma and prejudice surrounding them, and those who have been lost to the disease. Quasar plays with the idea of a diverse community, and states that the fight for inclusivity needs to come from both within and outside the LGBTQ community – from all spheres of society. [Quasar states,] ‘This new design forces the viewer to reflect on their own feelings towards the original Pride flag and its meaning, as well as the differing opinions on who that flag really represents, while also bringing into clear focus the current needs within our community.’ ”

Article written by 
Andrina Tenisci

Recent Stories

June 30, 2022
May 4, 2022
December 16, 2021
February 1, 2021
November 30, 2020
October 2, 2020
June 22, 2020
October 10, 2018
October 10, 2018
October 10, 2018
October 10, 2018
October 10, 2018
STREETS
HOMES
HEALTH
JOBS
QUESTION
homesunbubbleheart-pulsebriefcasearrow-right